Food+Recipes

How Food Manufacturers Trick Consumers With Deceptive Nutrition Labels

By  

Did you know that “high in fiber” often means high in maltodextrin or other isolated fibers, and not necessarily fiber that’s nutritionally beneficial? Did you know phrases like “made with whole wheat” are frequently used when only 1% or 2% of a product contains whole grains?

“So many packaged foods are little more than white flour, fat, sugar, salt and additives in various combinations, yet they are marketed as modern-day medical miracles, offering vague benefits for virtually every part of the body,” said CSPI legal affairs director Bruce Silverglade. “The FDA has recently challenged some especially egregious health claims, such as the exaggerated cholesterol-reduction claims on Cheerios. But the agency should put a permanent stop to a wide range of other deceptive claims.”

Here’s how the Consumer for Science in the Public Interest would like to see food packaging nutrition labels re-designed:

beforeafterlabel

If you enjoyed this video, and you’re interested in learning wellness tips that are customized for women over 50, you'll LOVE this free Masterclass, where you'll learn the Most Powerful Way to Lose Weight Age 50+ and Keep It Off For Good, So You Can Be Around to See Your Grandkids Grow Up (Instead of Becoming a Burden to Your Family)

Learn More

About:

More like this:
Food+Recipes

" How Food Manufacturers Trick Consumers With Deceptive Nutrition Labels "